Chikungunya fever: an old disease re-emerges

The new era of globalization and environmental change has witnessed the arrival of many new and re-emerging diseases which create new challenges for policy makers and researchers working on infectious diseases. Massive urbanization has facilitated the spread of contagious diseases in human populations due to faster travel over greater distances and worldwide trade. Although more affluent countries are better-equipped to …

West Nile: A life changed by one mosquito bite

Rhode Island News 01:00 AM EDT on Sunday, September 20, 2009 FELICE J. FREYER Journal Medical Writer Jana Hesser participates in the Save the Bay Swim from Newport to Jamestown in August. Less than a year earlier she was paralyzed by an unusually severe case of West Nile virus and spent two months in the hospital. The Providence Journal / …

Mosquito control — licensed to kill (part one)

Adulticide On a sultry summer evening, under the spreading light of a streetlamp, two children play a game of hopscotch. So absorbed in their activity are they, completely unmindful of their surroundings, that they do not see or hear the stranger approaching. Slowly but purposefully, the silent killer creeps along, getting ever closer. Something alerts them, the truck engine, perhaps, …

Child recovers from rare encephalitis: Brain infection carried by mosquitoes

by Debbie Gilbert White County News Susan Goodrich never dreamed that a mosquito bite could endanger her child’s life. The Sautee resident admits she’s a bit of a “hypochondriac” when it comes to protecting her family’s health. They use hand sanitizers and they always get their flu shots. So when her 6-year-old daughter, Summer, fell ill last month with a …

Mosquito bites are cause for concern

Jennifer Parks Staff Writer The Albany Herald Saturday, July 25, 2009 ALBANY – Theoretically, all it takes to contract the West Nile virus is one bite. And while most people bitten by Southwest Georgia mosquitoes don’t become sick, there are others who aren’t so lucky. So with West Nile nearing its peak season, health officials are warning residents to take …

Georgia Mosquitoes in the News

Grady reports Eastern Equine Encephalitis Posted: July 13, 2009 04:41 PM ALBANY, GA (WALB) – A horse in Grady County has tested positive for Eastern Equine Encephalitis, a disease that can cause severe illness and death in humans. The virus is spread the same way as West Nile, through the bite of an infected mosquito. District Health Director Jacqueline Grant …

Public health officials: West Nile virus risk higher after plentiful spring rains

Northwest Georgia Public Health is watching and waiting to see if the growing mosquito population throughout the 10 county area will cause more cases of West Nile Virus. Logan Boss, district marketing manager and public information officer, is more concerned with the mosquito eggs in backyards than he is about those in the woods. “Now that we’re getting into a …

The Face of West Nile Virus

Pastor’s next stop: Mayo Clinic Delayed diagnosis of West Nile virus has lasting effects By KATHERINE HAWES GateHouse News Service Galesburg.com Posted Jun 09, 2009 @ 10:19 AM GALVA — As Rebekah Montgomery finishes her tenure as interim pastor of First Baptist Church of Galva, she is preparing for a new challenge — becoming a patient at the Mayo Clinic. …

Pets are in greater danger of getting heart worms

Posted: May 16, 2009 06:34 PM By Delivrine Registre – ALBANY, GA (WALB) – The battle continues against mosquitoes in Southwest Georgia. And that fight may move to the air. They are breeding and biting, and county officials are receiving a record number of complaints after the mosquito population exploded during spring flooding. Dougherty County officials are now talking with …

This year’s mosquito season could be a bad one, a Georgia expert says

Surge in mosquitoes expected, expert says By Preston Sparks | Staff Writer Wednesday, May 13, 2009 This year’s mosquito season could be a bad one, a Georgia expert says. “With returned rains, I would think we’re going to have populations that we haven’t experienced in two to three years,” said Elmer Gray, a University of Georgia public health extension specialist …